Rosh Hashanah: Jewish New Year Begins at Sundown Sep. 6, Lasts 2 Days

Rosh Hashanah: Jewish New Year Begins at Sundown Sep. 6, Lasts 2 Days


The Jewish New Year, or Rosh Hashanah (“Head of the Year”), begins at sundown on Monday, September 6 this year, and is celebrated for the following two days, ending at nightfall on Wednesday, September 8.

The day is one of both celebration and solemn ceremony. Traditionally, Jews gather in homes and synagogues to pray and enjoy festive meals, including apples dipped in honey to signify a sweet new year, and challah bread filled with fruit (often raisins) to symbolize good deeds.

Apples dipped in honey (Zlatko Unger / Flickr / CC / Cropped)

Though challah loaves may be any shape at any time of year, on Rosh Hashanah, round loaves are typically eaten to symbolize the renewal of the yearly cycle, and the cycle of life itself.

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A shofar, or ram’s horn, is sounded 100 times on both days (except on occasions when Rosh Hashanah falls on a

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