The Long Arm of Justice: How Far Can the DoJ Really Go in Prosecuting Foreign Actors?

The Long Arm of Justice: How Far Can the DoJ Really Go in Prosecuting Foreign Actors?


In early October, the U.S. Department of Justice revealed its Cryptocurrency Enforcement Framework, a report laying bare the government’s vision for emerging threats and enforcement strategies in the cryptocurrency space. The document is an important source of insight into how the laws governing digital finance will be soon implemented on the ground.

One of the fundamental principles that the government asserts in the document is its broad extraterritorial jurisdiction over foreign-based actors who use virtual assets in ways that harm U.S. residents or businesses. The guidance sets an extremely low bar for perpetrators of cross-border crime to clear before they face prosecution.

According to the framework, it can be enough for a crypto transaction to “touch financial, data storage, or other computer systems within the United States” to provoke enforcement action. Is the stringency of this approach unprecedented across other domains of financial crimes enforcement? What actual tools does the U.S. government have to counter criminals acting from overseas?

Trending: Bulldog Trump Attorney To Raffensperger: “People Are Going To Prison In Georgia”

Continue reading

You Might Like

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!
Send this to a friend