After Uvalde, Should Texas Let School Districts Run Their Own Police Departments?

After Uvalde, Should Texas Let School Districts Run Their Own Police Departments?


On May 24, as a murderous gunman wrought terror and death through two adjoining classrooms full of children at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, 19 municipal police officers stood in the hallway outside, waiting. Forty-seven more minutes elapsed before the officers, led by officers from the Border Patrol Tactical Unit (BORTAC), breached the door and neutralized the situation.

That’s 47 minutes. Waiting.

The incident was managed by Pedro Arredondo, the chief of the Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Department. In Texas, school districts may allow a law enforcement presence on their campuses either by contract with an overlapping law enforcement entity—such as a municipal police department or county sheriff’s office—or by creating and staffing their own police department.

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Arredondo has run the UCISDPD since

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