A Century Later, ‘Rhapsody In Blue’ Remains An Iconic Piece Of American History

A Century Later, ‘Rhapsody In Blue’ Remains An Iconic Piece Of American History


Feb. 12 is Abraham Lincoln’s birthday. That was the reason why Paul Whiteman decided to hold a concert that day in 1924.

Paul Whiteman was the King of Jazz, and he was a king with a vision: to meld an orchestral approach with the burgeoning sound of American jazz. To many, this was seen as a fanciful idea. After all, jazz was played by small bands in speakeasy nightclubs. Orchestra, by large bands in grandiose concert halls. Jazz was all about embracing improvisation. Orchestra favored the assiduous process of perfecting the score. Jazz was seen as being more “black.” Orchestra, more “white.”

But Whiteman was above such talk — he was the king after all. What better day to make a statement to the world

Trending: Watch Live: Donald Trump Inspects Biden’s Broken Border in Visit to Eagle Pass, TX

Continue reading


 

Join the conversation!

Please share your thoughts about this article below. We value your opinions, and would love to see you add to the discussion!